Books

Doug's New Manuscript
THE WORLD ECONOMY
BEGINNINGS, MATURITY, COLLAPSE REBIRTH,
AND... NEXT?

read the manuscript

The world economy was born in the 17th century, began to grow in the 18th , matured in the late 19th, and became self-destructive with its two world wars in the 20th. The always swifter and deeper progress of technology guaranteed that the second war would be considerably more destructive than the first. During that war the USA began to think through and work toward what became a renewed world economy which, until recently, it has dominated. If there is a third world war, it would almost surely bring an end to our species.

 


Doug's Latest Book

Inequality has always been with us. But with the growth of capitalism worldwide, inequalities of wealth and power have taken on new dimensions, unknown in previous eras.

This book offers a lively critique of the rampant inequalities that have led to the present economic crisis. Dowd offers an overview of the rise of capitalist expansion, exploitation and oligarchic rule over the course of the twentieth century, and explains why inequality lies at the heart of today's financial troubles.

 

Table of Contents


Released in 2004, this magnum opus, in two volumes, is a comprehensive explication of what is and has been wrong with the U.S.A. Call it "the promise" versus "the performance."

 

 


back to top

Major economists and economic schools of thought are discussed in a chapter-by-chapter guide that covers Marx, Veblen, Gramsci, post-Keynesian theory, Sweezy and the Monopoly Capital school, and recent Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen, among others. Contributors include Michael Lebowitz, Carl Boggs, Michael Keaney, Frederic Lee, John Bellamy Foster and Robin Hahnel.

 


back to top

And It's Each for Himself and God for All: Once More, U.S. Capitalism on a Rampage (Pacifica, Calif.: VaiVecchio Press, 2001)

This classic book is an ideal introduction to economic thought and the dominance of capitalism, ideal for students of economic theory and history. Now thoroughly revised and updated, this new edition includes a new preface and an additional chapter by the author. Analysing the relationship between economic thought and capitalism from 1750 to the present, Douglas Dowd examines the dynamic interaction of two processes: the historical realities of capitalism and the evolution of economic theory.

 


back to top

A sardonic critique of conventional economics and the current drift of social policy--written by a well-respected leftist economist, who hosts a popular monthly radio show devoted to the discussion of economic issues.

 


back to top

"Blues for America is a scholar's deft survey of everything that happened between the 1920s and the 1990s-depressions, repressions, segregation, and wars-and the resistance that arose to each in turn, related with surprising wit and an amazingly gracious turn of phrase. And by weaving in bits of autobiography, Dowd has given us much more."
--Barbara Ehrenreich

 


back to top

In many respects an update of the author's The Twisted Dream (1974, 1977), with (in the wake of the end of the Cold War and consequent celebration of the "free market") an increased emphasis on the ideology and the realities of the free market in our past. A critical inquiry into the nature of and the reasons for the developing social crisis in the US--"at once economic, political, and moral, simultaneously domestic and international."

 


back to top

The waste is in arms production, unemployed resources, restrictions on output, financial manipulation, advertising, unnecessary activities generated by the pursuit of profit, bureaucracy, and the overcapacity in some fields that coexists with shortages in others. The analysis slips back and forth between perceptive insights and good historical perspectives on the one hand and conventional arguments-some mainstream, some left-leaning-on the other.

 


back to top

Translated and published in Italy as Storia del Capitalismo Americano dal 1776 [Milan, Mazzotta, 1976]

 


back to top

Step by Step is not simply one more book about civil rights, designed to underscore the repression of the American Negro and relate episodically what some have done about it, even though the book does serve both those functions to a degree. This book is unique in that its aim is to instruct those who would become involved in the civil rights struggle - instruct them in how to develop and work out a project.

 


back to top

Doug Dowd "published" this book himself for several years—first as mimeographed material for classes at Cornell, then printed up locally as "the little red book." Through word of mouth, the little red book sold about 20,000 copies. Only then was picked up by Heath.

 


back to top

Thorstein Veblen shook the complacency of America in the early twentieth century with his incisive criticisms of our social and economic systems. Discarding the classical view of "eternal" economic laws that conveniently justified the nineteenth-century predatory practices of "big business" in terms of rational self-interest, Veblen cast a fresh, merciless eye on America's money-making passion.

 


back to top

Ed. and contributor, Thorstein Veblen: A Critical Reappraisal (Ithaca: Cornell Univ. Press, 1958; reissued by Greenwood Press, 1982)

Ed. and contributor, America's Role in the World Economy (Boston, Heath, 1966)


back to top